Mortons Neuroma Surgery

Overview

interdigital neuromaMortons Neuroma is a common painful condition involving compression of nerves between the long bones of the forefoot just before they enter the toes. Commonly this involves the 3rd and 4th toes, however may affect the 2nd and 3rd toes. Repeated trauma or compression of these nerves causes the nerves to swell and thicken causing a Morton’s neuroma to develop.

Causes

Experts are not sure what exactly causes Morton’s neuroma. It seems to develop as a result of irritation, pressure or injury to one of the digital nerves that lead to the toes, which triggers a body response, resulting in thickened nerve tissue (neuroma). Feet conditions/situations that can cause the bones to rub against a nerve include high-heeled shoes, especially those over 2 inches (5cm), or a pointed or tight toe box which squash the toes together. This is probably why the condition is much more common in females than in males. High-arched foot, people whose feet have high arches are much more likely to suffer from Morton’s neuroma than others. Flat feet, the arch of the foot collapses. The entire sole of the foot comes into complete or near-complete contact with the ground. A bunion, a localized painful swelling at the base of the big toe, which enlarges the joint. Hammer toe, a deformity of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the second, third, or fourth toe causing it to be permanently bent. Some high-impact sporting activities including running, karate, and court sports. Any sport that places undue pressure on the feet. Injuries, an injury or other type of trauma to the foot may lead to a neuroma.

Symptoms

Typically, there’s no outward sign of this condition, such as a lump. Instead, you may experience the following symptoms. A feeling as if you’re standing on a pebble in your shoe. A burning pain in the ball of your foot that may radiate into your toes. Tingling or numbness in your toes. It’s best not to ignore any foot pain that lasts longer than a few days. See your doctor if you experience a burning pain in the ball of your foot that’s not improving, despite changing your footwear and modifying activities that may cause stress to your foot.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of Morton?s Neuroma typically involves a physical examination of the affected foot. Your health care provider will ask you about your symptoms and examine your feet and toes. He will manipulate your toes, pushing them from side to side and squeezing on the spaces in between. This physical exam will allow your health care provider to feel for any lumps that may be present under the soft tissue of your feet. Your health care provider may also listen for any clicking sounds that your bones may be making. Known as Muldor?s Sign, this clicking is common amongst sufferers of foot neuroma. Occasionally, an x-ray or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is performed to help rule out any breaks, sprains, or fractures in your foot.

Non Surgical Treatment

The best results are achieved with massage techniques that encourage spreading and mobilizing the metatarsal heads. Metatarsal spreading is one technique that can help reduce the detrimental effects of nerve compression. To perform this technique, pull the metatarsal heads (not just the toes) apart and hold them in this position to help stretch the intrinsic foot muscles and other soft-tissues. When this technique is combined with the use of toe spacers, it will be even more effective.

Surgical Treatment

When early treatments fail and the neuroma progresses past the threshold for such options, podiatric surgery may become necessary. The procedure, which removes the inflamed and enlarged nerve, can usually be conducted on an outpatient basis, with a recovery time that is often just a few weeks. Your podiatric physician will thoroughly describe the surgical procedures to be used and the results you can expect. Any pain following surgery is easily managed with medications prescribed by your podiatrist.

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